Topps Baseball Set Reviews

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2010 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 661/330

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Prince Fielder

Subsets: All-Stars, Record Breakers, Checklists

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #-- 

My Thoughts On The Set: O-

2011 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 660/330

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Ryan Braun

Subsets: All-Stars, Record Breakers, Checklists

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #-- 

My Thoughts On The Set: O--

2012 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 661/330

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Ryan Braun

Subsets: All-Stars, Record Breakers, Checklists

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #-- 

My Thoughts On The Set: O--

2013 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 661/330 (minus card #7 retired for Mickey Mantle)

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Bryce Harper

Subsets: All-Stars, Record Breakers, Checklists

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #-- 

My Thoughts On The Set: O--

2014 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 661/330 (minus card #7 retired for Mickey Mantle)

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Mike Trout

Subsets: All-Stars, Record Breakers, Checklists

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #-- 

My Thoughts On The Set: O--

2015 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 700/400 (minus card #7 retired for Mickey Mantle)

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Derek Jeter

Subsets: All-Stars, Record Breakers, Checklists

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #-- 

My Thoughts On The Set: O--

2016 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 700/300 (minus card #7 retired for Mickey Mantle)

Players With Dual Cards: ---

Card #1: Mike Trout

Subsets: All-Stars, Record Breakers, Checklists

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #-- 

My Thoughts On The Set: O--

2017 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 700/300

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Kris Bryant

Subsets: League Leaders (30) All-Stars (66) Home Run Derby (8) Combos (10) Postseason Highlights (4) Rookie Debut (23) Rookie Combo (8) Highlight/Checklists (15)

The Best Cards: #520 Andrelton Simmons, #140 Jesse Hahn, #581 Brock Holt

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #US242 Mike Hauschild (Texas/Houston switched around in blurb)

My Thoughts On The Set: That 3D design had people talking leading up to the set's release. I was indifferent at first but have since grown to like it.

Design aside, what stands out in 2017 Topps is the addition of social media handles for many players, and the subtraction of career stats for all players. Commons now show 3-5 lines of statistics, regardless of experience or stature of the player.

WAY too many League Leader cards in this set (30). Topps didn't need to produce three cards per category. The reverse information became redundant and it led to .

Future Stars took a one-year absence from the base set, but some are available as an insert set.

Beginning with this set, card #7 returned to circulation (after being retired for Mickey Mantle), but was reserved for a star Yankee.

This marked the first time since 2010 Topps that no redundant Update cards were produced. By redundant, I mean players shown with the same team they were with in the base set.

David Ortiz received a sunset card with the Red Sox.

2017 Topps included a number of veterans who'd been absent from recent Topps sets. No one in the US besides me was excited to find Mike Dunn in the Update set.

2018 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 700/300

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Aaron Judge

Subsets: League Leaders (30) All-Stars (64) Home Run Derby (8) Combos (10) Postseason Highlights (4) Rookie Debut (10) Rookie Combo (10) Highlight/Checklists (15)

The Best Cards: # Matt Kemp

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: #361 (checklist; cards #364-365 switched up) #440 Troy Scribner (International League should be Pacific Coast League) #504 Scott Schebler (Dave Parker is called "Dace" Parker) #610 Scott Kazmir (misspelled "Did Not Player") #671 Tyler Clippard (Pizarro is misspelled Pizzaro)

My Thoughts On The Set: A bit of a disappointment following the solid 2017 set. Some teams were poorly represented compared to others. And the front design didn't do much for me, although I think I'd have liked it better had the set been deeper. Topps went without borders for the third straight year.

All but about 2-3 guys received action shots, which of course watered down the action. In a vacuum, however, many of the shots were pretty awesome.

Social media handles returned to the reverses, though slightly less prominently than in 2017 Topps. Also, statistics continued to be limited to 4-5 rows. Some of the blurbed "firsts" were way too isolated and specific. ("So-and-so became the first Nicaraguan catcher to ever come off the bench and hit an 8th-inning triple that erased a three-run deficit for an original American League franchise.") We're definitely out of the 1980's in this regard.

It was all about Shohei Ohtani's rookie card #700 this year. His batting card closed out the base set, while his pitching card opened the Update set. (Though he was depicted pitching on both cards, which made little sense to me.) Juan Soto, Gleyber Torres and Ronald Acuna were also hot rookies in 2018 Topps.

Jason Vargas (Mets) and Jose Pirela (Padres) received base and Update cards with the same clubs. Topps avoided such redundancy in 2017 but couldn't keep the streak alive.

Madison Bumgarner disappeared from Topps beginning with this set. Not sure exactly why. But Ichiro disappeared and returned so MadBum could, too.

Carlos Beltran retired after the '17 season but did not receive a sunset card.

Topps produced 30 League Leader cards (rather than the usual 10-12) for the second straight year. I was motivated to write the company about this.

2019 Topps/Topps Update

Set Size: 700/300

Players With Dual Cards: None

Card #1: Ronald Acuna Jr.

Subsets: League Leaders (10) All-Stars (60) Home Run Derby (8) Combos (10) Postseason Highlights (4) Rookie Debut (15) Rookie Combo (5) Highlight/Checklists (25)

The Best Cards: #--

Notable Uncorrected Error Cards: many with incorrect career WHIP/ERA totals. #30 Josh Hader (2018 WHIP wasn't 0.00) #159 Minute Maid Park (incorrect Gurriel XBH) #178 Jose Altuve (incorrect 2018/career stats)

#223 Jose Ramirez (incorrect 2018/career stats) #252 Jakob Junis (incorrect 2018 stats) #300 Christian Yelich (missing League Leader In Italics line) #360 Mark Melancon (hitting stat headers)

My Thoughts On The Set: I liked most everything about this set except the last names positioned above the first names. For unfamiliar players like Lane Thomas who have two first names, it could get a little confusing.

In terms of team representation, this set felt a lot more balanced than 2018 Topps.

Topps tweaked the traditional Team cards this year. Now the cards depict each team's home ballpark on the front, with related data on the reverse. Instead of a summary of the past season, we now get lineup/rotation previews and team statistical leaders.

Several rookie cards, rather than the usual one line of minor league stats, received major league stats. LONG overdue in my opinion.

A number of marginal players appeared in 2019 Topps, such as Wilmer Font and Jon Edwards. Which wouldn't be an issue had so many non-marginal players been omitted. Jed Lowrie, a 2018 All-Star, did not turn up in base or Update. And Adrian Beltre didn't get a sunset card.