top of page
12/28/14: hylophobia (n/a), n.

1. fear of forests.

 

IN A SENTENCE: Darrick's hylophobia prevents him from fulfilling his fantasy of mating with an elk.

 

 

 

12/26/14: bellicose (bel i kohs), adj.

1. inclined or eager to fight; aggressively hostile, pugnacious.

 

IN A SENTENCE: Every time he passes the yoga center, Sam grows edgy and bellicose since his hand is broken.

12/16/14: supercilious (soo-per-sil-ee-uh s), adj.

1. haughtily disdainful or, contemptuous, as a person or facial expression

IN A SENTENCE: Hannah walks around all supercilious just because she's never accidentally gone to work with gum in her hair.

12/13/14: tocophobia (n/a), n.

1. fear of pregnancy or childbirth.

IN A SENTENCE: Ted combats his tocophobia by running away whenever a girl likes him.

12/9/14: vassal (vas-uh l), n.

1. a subordinate; slave.

IN A SENTENCE: Lance hired his own personal vassal to clean up after he number twos.

12/7/14: chionophobia (n/a), n.

1. fear of snow.

IN A SENTENCE: Johnny's chlonophobia cost him $100, as his friends dared him to poke a snowman's butt.

12/3/14: indolent (in-dl-uh nt), adj.

1. lazy, indifferent.

IN A SENTENCE: Kerry had planned to clean her house, but indolence won out and she scratched her pits instead.

11/29/14: brontophobia (n/a), n.

1. fear of thunder and lightning.

IN A SENTENCE: Regina's date with brontophobic Hal ended when a drop of rain landed on his shoe and he screamed.

11/25/14: epoch (ep-uh k), n.

1. a particular period of time marked by distinctive features, events, etc.

IN A SENTENCE: Marty's 21st birthday kicked off an epoch of booze, sweating, diarrhea and puking.

 
11/21/14: obviate (ob-vee-eyt), v.

1. to anticipate and prevent or eliminate (difficulties, disadvantages, etc.) by effective measures; render unnecessary.

 

IN A SENTENCE: Ernie obviated his company's no-working-during-lunch policy by bringing three lunches.

 

 
11/18/14: compunction (kuh m-puhngk-shuh), n.

1.  a feeling of uneasiness or anxiety of the conscience caused by regret for doing wrong or causing pain.

2. any uneasiness or hesitation about the rightness of an action.

 

IN A SENTENCE: Courtney battled guilt and great compunction over stealing Daryl's used underwear and showing it to his colleagues.

 
11/14/14: atelophobia (n/a), v.

1.  a fear of imperfection, defects.

IN A SENTENCE: Jamie suffered from atelophobia for years, until he invested in a competent hype man..

11/10/14: exsanguinate (eks-sang-gwuh-neyt), v.

1.  to drain of blood; make bloodless.

IN A SENTENCE: Damon wants to exsanguinate a vampire just to see what would happen.

11/7/14: cacography (kuh-kog-ruh-fee), n.

1.  poor penmanship; bad handwriting.

IN A SENTENCE: Because of the sloppy cacography in Darren's note, his crush called—and brought pizza to—the wrong guy.

11/3/14: ineffable (in-ef-uh-buhl), adj.

1. incapable of being expressed or described in words; inexpressible.

IN A SENTENCE: After an hour with ugly, hairy girls, Doug felt ineffable relief upon barfing on the floor..

11/1/14: coulrophobia (kool-ruh-foh-bee-uh), noun.

1. a fear of clowns.

IN A SENTENCE: From age five on, Janet suffered intense coulrophobia. It's because her mom accidentally set two clowns on fire once

10/28/14: cloying (kloi-ing), adj.

4. causing or tending to cause disgust or aversion through excess.

IN A SENTENCE: Sean showers his wife with cloying attention whenever he's on a mission for fresh cupcakes.

10/22/14: phalanx (fey-langks, fal-angks), n.

4. a compact or closely massed body of persons, animals, or things.

IN A SENTENCE: Though it took awhile, Amber managed to escape the entire phalanx of kooks who thought she was Beyonce.

10/18/14: inure (in-yoo r), v.

1. to accustom to hardship, difficulty, pain, etc.; toughen or harden.

IN A SENTENCE: Roger has inured himself to his partner's disturbing, violent nightmares.

10/13/14: assiduously (uh-sij-oo-uh s), adv.

1. constant, unremitting.  2. working diligently.

IN A SENTENCE: Though Toby assiduously worked to unlock the door, Sheila grew impatient and used an ax instead.

10/8/14: recalcitrant (ri-kal-si-truh nt), adj.

1. resisting authority or control; not obedient or compliant; refractory.

2. hard to deal with, manage, or operate.   3. (n) a recalcitrant person.

IN A SENTENCE: Shannon demanded 30 minutes of smooches from Scott, but being a fierce recalcitrant he only gave 10.

10/6/14: buoyant (boi-uh nt, boo-yuh nt), adj.

2. cheerful or invigorating.

IN A SENTENCE: Edith has been exceptionally buoyant ever since her husband bought her a PlayStation.

10/5/14: enmity (en-mi-tee), n.

1. a feeling or condition of hostility; hatred; ill will; animosity; antagonism.

IN A SENTENCE: Howard developed enmity for his brother upon learning he used Howard's credit card to buy gas for strangers in hopes of getting on the news.

9/25/14: capricious (kuh-prish-uh s), adj. 

2. subject to, led by, or indicative of a sudden, odd notion or unpredictable change; erratic.

IN A SENTENCE: Jan is known to be unpredictable, like when she capriciously rubbed a guy's shoulders right before pepper-spraying him.

9/23/14: feckless (fek-lis), adj. 

2. indifferent, lazy, no sense of responsibility.

IN A SENTENCE: Because of Darren's feckless approach to relationships, he now has to settle for lazy, broke women.

9/21/14: capitulate (kuh-pich-uh-leyt), v. 

1. To surrender unconditionally or on stipulated terms.

IN A SENTENCE: After months of not letting her boyfriend use her bathroom, Tracy finally capitulated.

9/19/14: vacuity (va-kyoo-i-tee), n.

2. absence of thought or intelligence; inanity; blankness.

IN A SENTENCE: Tim liked Shannon not just for her willingness to pay for everything, but also for her vacuity.

9/16/14: ostentatious (os-ten-tey-shuh s), adj.

1. characterized by or given to pretentious or conspicuous show in an attempt to impress others.

IN A SENTENCE: Teri and Ivan were having a nice time. Then she ostentatiously whipped out her imported French sponge collection, expecting him to be impressed.

9/14/14: rotary (roh-tuh-ree), n. 

3. a part of a machine that rotates about an axis.

4. a roundabout (for traffic).

IN A SENTENCE: Jimmy and Mark got caught tickling each other in the middle of the rotary.

bellicose
supercillious
vassal
epoch
obviate
compunction
exsanguinate
cacography
ineffable
indolent
cloying
phalanx
inure
assiduously
recacitrant
buoyant
enmity
capricious
feckless
capitulate
vacuity
ostentatius
rotary
bottom of page